The Golden Age and the Reversal of the Myth of Good Government in Plato’s Statesman. A Lesson on the Use of Models

Keywords: Plato's Statesman, Golden Age, divine shepherd, king-shepherd, ruler-weaver, ruler and ruled, model, paradigm

Abstract

We would be wrong to state that Plato’s approach to the Golden Age in the Statesman occurs through nostalgia, even if he stresses the immense distance between our world and that blessed time. After evoking the shepherd-god as a ruler, Plato shows that the completely abandoned disposition of the ruled is only justifiable in presence of an unbridgeable chasm between the two, such as that between gods and men, or men and beasts. The real question in the Statesman is how to single out the peculiar form of knowledge possessed by the few men that are truly capable to rule.

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Published
2020-08-03
How to Cite
de Luise, F. (2020). The Golden Age and the Reversal of the Myth of Good Government in Plato’s Statesman. A Lesson on the Use of Models. PLATO JOURNAL, 20, 21-37. https://doi.org/10.14195/2183-4105_20_2
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Articles